Monday, June 22 | 1:30 – 5:00

 

Chair: Beth-Anne Schuelke-Leech, PEng, MBA, PhD, Associate Professor, Engineering Management and Entrepreneurship, University of Windsor
Chair of the IEEE Society on Social Implications of Technology Standards Committee (SSIT SC)

What do public and private sector officials need to know about non-governmental efforts to develop standards for Artificial Intelligence? In this workshop, representatives from the IEEE standards association will introduce IEEE standards making to individuals interested in understanding how IEEE is moving into standards making that addresses the social implications of technology.  We aspire to introduce attendees to the IEEE Society for Social Implications of Technology standards making and the IEEE Ethically Aligned Design initiative.    

Components of this workshop will include panels that discuss the issues in developing and implementing standards as well as invite participants to offer their guidance on the standards that their industry will need as they move forward to incorporate AI into their workflow.

1:30 pm Opening Remarks 

Beth-Anne Schuelke-Leech, PEng, MBA, PhD, Associate Professor, Engineering Management and Entrepreneurship, University of Windsor
Chair of the IEEE Society on Social Implications of Technology Standards Committee (SSIT SC)

1:35 Standards, Standards Making, and the Importance of Standards for Artificial Intelligence

In the recent EU White Paper on Artificial Intelligence, there was some surprising language included about the use of “prior conformity assessment” to help guide governance of AI uses in “high-risk” areas that affect consumer safety.  For the uninitiated, the introduction of conformity assessment systems may seem esoteric, but for those with experience in standardization, this was a boon (or a bane?) to standardization. In this session, we explain what standards are, how the technical specific use of the term standards invites discussions of consensus, rigor, and conformity, and discuss how the IEEE process of standards making will help to address concerns about the ethical governance of AI.

3:00 Grand Opening Refreshment Break in the Expo

3:45 Which Standards are Needed for the AI Space?

AI are a disruptive technology.  Autonomous and intelligent systems are able to recommend actions or even act independently of human influence.  Therefore, the conventional standards making process may need modification in order to more fully consider the ethical and societal impacts of the development and deployment of AI technologies, algorithms, and systems.  This session is designed to spark a dialogue about the specific challenges that AI presents for standards development and to identify points at which those challenges can be leveraged to improve standards making in this space.  For example, the ability of AI to recommend decisions to human actors puts some distance between the decision-makers and decision-takers. This will include instances of AI challenging the ability of industry to conform to standards when humans cannot peer into the systems meant to be standardized.  In this session, we hope to envision the future of standards in AI enabled government and industrial environments.

4:55 Closing Remarks and Next Steps

Beth-Anne Schuelke-Leech, PEng, MBA, PhD, Associate Professor, Engineering Management and Entrepreneurship, University of Windsor
Chair of the IEEE Society on Social Implications of Technology Standards Committee (SSIT SC)

5:00 Welcome Reception in the Expo

6:15 Meetup Groups

7:45 Close of Day 1

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